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Adrian Cockcroft: “Google will not be a huge factor in enterprise computing”


Adrian was speaking at Gigaom’s Structure event and one detail of Gigaom’s article struck my attention. According to them Adrian thinks: ” Google will not be a huge factor in enterprise computing”.

How can it be that one of the biggest technology companies, owner of the most advanced distributed systems in the world and the inventor of cloud computing for internal use, can not get enterprise computing?

Why is Google’s Cloud not ready for Enterprise Computing?

1) Cloud-only vision

Google is the only of the three that has a Cloud-only vision. The two others understand that enterprises will not drop everything their doing and moving overnight all systems to the cloud. Without a “VPC” or hybrid cloud vision, Google is going nowhere.

2) Focused on the visionnaires

API solutions for mobile, prediction, etc. are all good and well but most enterprises don’t know what oAuth and REST mean. They are still stuck in the Corba, J2EE/RMI, Dotnet, etc. era. Yes Google has Apps, Gmail, etc. and they can compete with Office, Exchange, etc. but most enterprise software is customised for Office integration, not yet for Apps integration.

3) Lack of exit strategy

If you are a challenger you need to convince enterprises that the risk of moving to your platform is worth it. The best strategy is to say that people can easily go back. When AWS was only starting, you had Eucalyptus being the exit strategy. What will a CTO do when Google’s prediction API becomes too expensive? In enterprises the expression has always been: “Nobody ever got fired for choosing [fill in SAP, Microsoft, Oracle, etc.]”. AWS is the dominant player. Without an exit strategy Google is a big risk for enterprises.

4) Lack of trust

Google’s Gmail is famous for reading your emails and putting targeted ads on the Internet. Snowden, the NSA and Google scare non-American enterprises.

Solutions?

1) Cheapest without free movement is worthless

Google is starting a price war but AWS and Azure have done a good job at locking people into their services APIs. Google should work on multi-cloud solutions that allow people to convert any software into as-a-Service, a.k.a. Anything-as-a-Service / XaaS. Make people independent of the cloud provider and price becomes the most important aspect. There are solutions already for XaaS, you just need to know where to look.

2) On-Site Option

Google should embrace OpenStack and make sure it delivers on-par with the market leader VMWare but more importantly make sure that there is a one click option to move between OpenStack on-premise and the Google cloud as well as vice-versa.

3) Easy path from yesterday to tomorrow

Are you hooked on Exchange, Oracle, SAP, etc.? There should be easy migration tools as well as solutions to encapsulate the past and make it work with the future. Instant legacy integration is possible. Again you just need to know where to look.

4) Trust & SLA

One simple message: “Google will not spy on you and will give you the best SLA of the cloud industry”.

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